Boss FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb

Editor’s Rating
Rating

Boss FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb

Amazon: Boss FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb

Summary

Pros: An impressively accurate tonal replication of the classic Fender Spring Reverb, all in a well-built, portable and reliable stompbox.
Cons: Only does spring reverb, so its functionality is very limited.
Overall: A great pedal for players who want an accurate spring sound and nothing else, but without the flexibility in sound many guitarists would want in a reverb pedal.

Full Review

The Fender Spring Reverb was an integral component of surf music – in many ways launching the genre – and (while surf may have fallen out of favor) has since become a common addition to country, blues and rockabilly. But what if you don’t own an early 60s tube-powered Fender Reverb unit, or don’t want to lug it around with you to gigs? Working with Fender themselves, Boss have used their COSM modeling technology to produce what bills itself as the ultimate stompbox size emulation: the FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb.

The pedal has a vintage aesthetic, and gives you the same three dials as the original – “Tone,” “Mixer” and “Dwell” – to control the sound. “Mixer” lets you choose the wet-to-dry signal ratio, “Dwell” adjusts the delay time of the effect and “Tone” lets you move from dark to bright sounds. If you’re familiar with the original effect, you’ll be right at home, but it’s easy to learn to dial in anything from the deep and warm right through to twanging tones.

The emulation is pretty good – definitely up there with the best copies you can find – and you’re unlikely to be disappointed unless you’re a purist. Side by side with the real deal, you can notice that it’s lacking some dynamics and is comparatively one-dimensional, but even if you’re used to the genuine effect, the differences are minor enough that you forget about them if you’re using the FRV-1 more regularly than the real deal. In terms of tone and spring response, it does a fantastic job.

The only thing really holding it back is the entire purpose of the pedal altogether. Ask yourself if you want as accurate a replication of the Spring Reverb as possible or if you want a versatile reverb pedal. Although they might not get as close to the genuine spring sound, even options like the Holy Grail that are relatively limited in functionality have more variety in sound to offer than the one-function FRV-1. If you only want spring reverb, it’s great, but the number of players that applies to is obviously quite limited.

The FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb does its job surprisingly well, but unless you’re really into surf, rockabilly, blues or twanging country, the variety offered by other pedals may be preferable.

Check Prices

Amazon: Boss FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb

Boss FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb Demo

Boss FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb4Admin2016-03-31 04:23:38The Fender Spring Reverb was an integral component of surf music – in many ways launching the genre – and (while surf may have fallen out of favor) has since become a common addition to country, blues and rockabilly. But what if you don’t own an early 60s tube-powered Fender Reverb unit, or don’t want to lug it around with you to gigs? Working with Fender themselves, Boss have used their COSM modeling technology to produce what bills itself as the ultimate stompbox size emulation: the FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb. Check Amazon Price…

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